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dc.contributor.advisorBourassa, Adam
dc.contributor.advisorDegenstein, Doug
dc.creatorRunge, Ethan 1993-
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-15T17:24:23Z
dc.date.available2018-11-15T17:24:23Z
dc.date.created2018-10
dc.date.issued2018-11-15
dc.date.submittedOctober 2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/11513
dc.description.abstractThe Limb Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer Experiment (LIFE) project is a collaborative effort between the University of Saskatchewan, Canadian Space Agency (CSA), and ABB Canada funded through the CSA Flights and Fieldwork for the Advancement of Science and Technology (FAST) initiative. The intent of the LIFE project is to prototype a satellite instrument capable of determining the vertical distribution of water vapor, ozone, methane and nitrous oxide, which are radiatively and chemically important trace species in the Earths atmosphere. From eventual deployment into low Earth orbit, LIFE will provide high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, which will fill a key observational need for atmospheric trend and process studies. LIFE builds on the success of the Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging in the Atmosphere (GLORIA) instrument and aims to reduce the costs involved with implementing a successful infrared imaging Fourier Transform spectrometer (IFTS). This thesis is concerned with the design of a balloon borne prototype version of the LIFE instrument. This requires an understanding of relevant background and the development of a model capable of creating an end-to-end simulator that is used to evaluate the performance of design alternatives. As an imager, LIFE has the benefit of taking simultaneous measurements at different altitudes, avoiding temporal degradation present in other instruments. This introduces several non-idealities due to off-axis effects, which need careful consideration and analysis. Through noise equivalent spectral radiance (NESR), the performance of the instrument under the influence of noise is determined. The design created for the first prototype of the LIFE project meets an NESR that allows the completion of scientific goals, building a foundation upon which further study and instrument refinement continues at the University of Saskatchewan. Additionally, this design has a low cost when compared to the instruments which inspired the project, creating a compelling opportunity for further development as a space mission. The proliferation of such instruments would further increase the amount of data from the observational gap, allowing a more detailed understanding of the atmosphere to be developed.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectImaging
dc.subjectFTS
dc.subjectThermal
dc.titleLimb Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer Experiment (LIFE)
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-11-15T17:24:24Z
thesis.degree.departmentPhysics and Engineering Physics
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysics
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewan
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)
dc.type.materialtext
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKelly, Tim
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcWilliams, Kathryn
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMoewes, Alex
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPywell, Rob
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-9335-776X


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