Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMartin , Stephanie
dc.creatorWinslow, Tessa
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-21T23:12:36Z
dc.date.available2021-01-21T23:12:36Z
dc.date.created2020-12
dc.date.issued2021-01-21
dc.date.submittedDecember 2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/13220
dc.description.abstractInterpersonal trauma has been shown to have deleterious effects on the physical and mental health of some survivors. Many who experience post-traumatic symptomology also experience a weakened connection with the self and with others, which further exacerbates the sequalae of trauma. Many argue that the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) must be properly regulated before a traumatic incident can be processed verbally, which has garnered support for somatic therapies, especially yoga. Recent research suggests that regular yoga practice can be successful in regulating the nervous system, reducing PTSD symptomology, and fostering posttraumatic growth in those who have experienced interpersonal trauma. The present study elaborated upon such research by drawing upon existentialist theories and using an Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) methodology in order to provide an in depth understanding of the question; How do survivors of interpersonal trauma experience the self following regular yoga practice? Five participants aged 31-37 who fostered posttraumatic growth through regular yoga practice engaged in 90 minute, in depth, semi-structured interviews. The overarching theme of this study was Lightness and Liberation, and the superordinate themes included Expanding Compassion, Trusting Personal Strength, Enjoying Experiences, and Reclaiming Self. These findings provide support for previous research about trauma and yoga, as well as insight valuable to clinicians about the lived experience of self following regular yoga practice.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectinterpersonal trauma, posttraumatic growth, yoga, somatic therapies
dc.titleLightness and Liberation: How Survivors of Interpersonal Trauma Experience the Self Following Regular Yoga Practice
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2021-01-21T23:12:36Z
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychology and Special Education
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool and Counselling Psychology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewan
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)
dc.type.materialtext
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKalyn, Brenda
dc.contributor.committeeMemberQuinlan, Elizabeth
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-4647-0986


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record