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dc.contributor.advisorWoodhouse , Howard
dc.creatorHuntley, Jed
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-20T23:31:49Z
dc.date.available2021-04-20T23:31:49Z
dc.date.created2021-04
dc.date.issued2021-04-15
dc.date.submittedApril 2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10388/13341
dc.description.abstractAbstract This thesis is an account of my own journey into an Indigenous way of knowing, the teachings that stem from it and the potential path going forward. A decision-making process cemented in logic and reason, guided primarily by a Western way of knowing, marks the beginning of the journey. My journey into an Indigenous way of knowing is propelled by an inner urgency and a search for a deeper meaning to my existence. I engage in an extended conversation with a knowledge keeper of the Saulteaux traditional teachings of the Bear Clan and then reflect upon the meaning of these teachings. In doing so, the spiritual component of existence, which I have experienced through ceremony, is underlined as is its life-altering power to inform, alter and enhance my current way of knowing and being in this physical world. As Métis peoples we have been naturally gifted with two different ways of knowing. In order to make informed decisions about how to lead our physical existence, we need to understand both ways of knowing: to be able to see with both eyes. Neither system is inherently right or wrong. Hence, the extent to which each way of knowing becomes part of an individual Métis epistemology is a personal choice. Indigenous theory and Indigenous methodology are both used throughout the thesis. The concepts of Two-Eyed Seeing (Bartlett et al., 2012), narrative, storytelling, the conversational method as interview process, self-in-relation, self-referent and experiential learnings make meaning of the teachings and guide my reflections by providing the context for my insights. In the conclusion (chapter five), I write a letter to future Indigenous teachers, reflecting on the central role the spiritual component of existence can play in their journey as educators.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectIndigenous
dc.subjectSpirituality
dc.subjectSaulteaux
dc.subjectMétis
dc.subjectTwo-Eyed Seeing
dc.subjectCeremony
dc.subjectJourney
dc.subjectSelf
dc.subjectSUNTEP
dc.subjectSpiritual Teachings
dc.subjectTeacher Educators
dc.subjectAnishanabe
dc.subjectAnishinaabe
dc.subjectThe Way
dc.subjectBear Clan
dc.subjectIndigenous Spirituality
dc.subjectElder
dc.subjectKnowledge Holder
dc.titleSearching for a Better Way: My Journey into "Two-Eyed Seeing" - Reflections on Spiritual Teachings from a Saulteaux Knowledge Holder Relevant to future Indigenous Teachers
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2021-04-20T23:31:49Z
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Foundations
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewan
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)
dc.type.materialtext
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKovach, Margaret
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcVittie , Janet
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMacKay, Gail
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-1258-5662


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