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dc.contributor.authorLe, Me-Linh
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-10T18:20:55Z
dc.date.available2010-12-10T18:20:55Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationLibraries and Publishing 3.0: Occasional Paper Series No. 1, October (2008) 39-44en
dc.identifier.otherhttp://www.cla.ca/caslis/CASLIS-Paper-01.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/357
dc.description.abstractGoogle Scholar has been met with a range of reactions in the academic and library communities since it was introduced in beta mode in 2004. Students and researchers flocked to the site, taking comfort in its familiarity and easy-touse search box. Librarians, on the other hand, were more cautious in their approach. They were concerned not only with the secretive nature of Scholar, but with the idea that library users would begin and end their information searches with Scholar, unaware and uninterested in the wealth of information that they might be missing. In the years since then, the literature has been filled with studies on Scholar; many of them are content analyses that compare Scholar's results with a host of other search tools. After a brief introduction of Scholar, this paper will highlight a number of these content comparisons, including cases where it appears that researchers seem prejudiced against Scholar and its services. It is believed that by examining these content comparisons, it will be possible to detect a pattern in Scholar's subject strengths and weaknesses. Ultimately, this paper aims to show that Google Scholar is an undervalued search tool that has found acceptance in nearly all scholarly communities except for the library.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCASLISen
dc.subjectGoogle scholar; federated searching; content analysisen
dc.titleGoogle Scholar: an outcast in the library worlden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.typeNon-Refereed Paper


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