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dc.contributor.advisorWotherspoon, Terry
dc.creatorDaschuk, Mitch D.
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-26T21:03:12Z
dc.date.available2016-09-26T21:03:12Z
dc.date.created2016-10
dc.date.issued2016-09-26
dc.date.submittedOctober 2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/7488
dc.description.abstractI advance a sociological reappraisal of the Western punk rock youth cultural artistic form. Contrasting prevalent perspectives correlating punk rock culture with adolescent rites of superficial social rebellion, I argue that the art form often exudes an underappreciated level of sophistication. I argue for the presence of two dominant strains of punk artistic logic, and demonstrate how each correspond with popular trends in neo-Marxist social theory. However, I also note that these competing logics promote contradictory forms of punk artistic conduct. Incorporating the perspectives of Pierre Bourdieu, I link this imperative for ideological division with the punk artists’ placement within fields of cultural production. Drawing from the artistry and testimonies of historically significant punk artists (and artistic consecrators), I argue that notable instances of punk ideological debate simultaneously function to allow punk artists to compete amongst one another for claims to artistic distinction and authority. I consider significant case studies wherein ideological debates double as tactics through which artists bolster their own claims to distinction in striving to delegitimize the authority of their ideological competitors. I question whether the primary function of ideological punk artistic debate stem from sincere ideological imperatives, or concerns surrounding the processes of accrediting individual claims to artistic legitimacy within the punk artistic field. Critically considering the interaction between collectivist punk artistic ideologies and the individualistic imperative of asserting personal claims to authoritative punk identity, I conclude that movements toward internal differentiation ultimately undermine punk rocks’ capacity to serve as a substantive counter-hegemonic artistic movement.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectPunk Youth Subculture Youth Culture Art and Resistance Hegemony Subcultural Capital Culture Industry
dc.title"What was once rebellion is now clearly just a social sect": Identity, ideological conflict and the field of punk rock artistic production
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-09-26T21:03:12Z
thesis.degree.departmentSociology
thesis.degree.disciplineSociology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewan
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
dc.type.materialtext
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLovrod, Marie
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFindlay, Len
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSomerville, Kara
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPoudrier, Jennifer
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-5457-9199


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