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dc.contributor.advisorFindlay, Len
dc.creatorWaite-Newhouse, Kiefer 1992-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-29T21:56:29Z
dc.date.available2016-09-29T21:56:29Z
dc.date.created2016-08
dc.date.issued2016-09-29
dc.date.submittedAugust 2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/7511
dc.description.abstractUsing Theodor Adorno's aesthetic, economic, and cultural theories, this essay examines the Canadian television show Trailer Park Boys (2001-present) under the broad theme of "trash aesthetics." Set in the fictional Sunnyvale Trailer Park near Halifax, Nova Scotia, TPB mobilizes “trailer trash” stereotypes to tell the stories of a marginalized community of people rendered economically and cultural superfluous by the forces neoliberal globalization. The landscape of Sunnyvale is strewn with trash and soon-to-be trash, which often becomes appropriated by characters into useful commodities, causing garbage to have starkly different meanings within Sunnyvale. TBP’s portrayal of trash and its resulting “trash aesthetic” places garbage—what is normally hidden or “thrown away”—front and center, refusing to let “nature” or “the natural” be pristine or to let trash be forgotten. In this way, Sunnyvale becomes a place where the dialectic between nature and culture can become erased, presenting a potentially redemptive ethics and aesthetics to trash.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectTrailer Park Boys, Trash Aesthetics, Theodor Adorno, Frankfirt School, Garbage
dc.title“One Man’s Garbage is Another Man Person’s Good Ungarbage”: Trailer Park Boys, Adorno, and Trash Aesthetics
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-09-29T21:56:30Z
thesis.degree.departmentEnglish
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewan
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)
dc.type.materialtext
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-8988-2932


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