Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMcIntyre, Laureen
dc.creatorNordstrom, Almasa 1990-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-23T22:14:12Z
dc.date.available2017-08-23T22:14:12Z
dc.date.created2017-10
dc.date.issued2017-07-18
dc.date.submittedOctober 2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/8042
dc.description.abstractParental satisfaction of, and involvement, in early intervention programs is important for child success and promotes resilience in parents and children (Fantuzzo et al., 2006). Early intervention programs and parental involvement are especially significant for children with exceptionalities (Bradshaw, 2013; Dawson et al., 2010, Gerber et al., 2011; Robertson et al., 1999). This study investigated parents’ satisfaction and involvement with their child’s early intervention program. Specifically, the differences between parental characteristics and satisfaction levels was examined, as well as parents’ perceptions of the factors that helped and challenged their involvement was explored using resiliency theory. Parents/primary caregivers (n = 100) of students who were 3 to 6 years old and in daycare, prekindergarten, or kindergarten completed an adapted version of the Parent Satisfaction Educational Experiences Scale (Fantuzzo et al., 2006) and responded to a series of open-ended questions related to the factors limiting or helping their involvement. No significant differences were found in satisfaction or involvement when looking at the child’s age, parent’s age, and the parent’s highest educational level. Thematic analyses of parents’ responses to posed open-ended question found that while many parents had positive experiences with the teacher and their child’s program, some parents reported lack of communication with the teacher and personal factors as negatively affecting their involvement. This research provides an initial exploration of what parents value and how their involvement affects their perception of their child’s program. This provides initial feedback on how educators and policy makers can improve programming, communication, and increase parental involvement which may positively influence parental satisfaction. Further research is needed to explore the dynamic parent-teacher relationship and how parents’ involvement fits into their child’s early intervention program.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectparental satisfaction
dc.subjectparental involvement
dc.subjectearly intervention programs
dc.titleEarly Intervention Experiences: Parental Satisfaction, Involvement, and Perception of Quality
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2017-08-23T22:14:12Z
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychology and Special Education
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewan
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)
dc.type.materialtext
dc.contributor.committeeMemberClaypool, Tim
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHellsten, Laurie
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBalzer, Geraldine
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-3388-8726


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record