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dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorPohler, Dionne
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-17T14:49:04Z
dc.date.available2018-07-17T14:49:04Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationSchmidt, J. A., & Pohler, D. M. (2018). Making stronger causal inferences: Accounting for selection bias in associations between high performance work systems, leadership, and employee and customer satisfaction. Journal of Applied Psychology. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/apl0000315en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/8667
dc.description©American Psychological Association, 2018. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the Journal of Applied Psychology. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: 10.1037/apl0000315en_US
dc.description.abstractWe develop competing hypotheses about the relationship between high performance work systems (HPWS) with employee and customer satisfaction. Drawing on 8 years of employee and customer survey data from a financial services firm, we used a recently developed empirical technique—covariate balanced propensity score (CBPS) weighting—to examine if the proposed relationships between HPWS and satisfaction outcomes can be explained by reverse causality, selection effects, or commonly omitted variables such as leadership behavior. The results provide support for leader behaviors as a primary driver of customer satisfaction, rather than HPWS, and also suggest that the problem of reverse causality requires additional attention in future human resource (HR) systems research. Model comparisons suggest that the estimates and conclusions vary across CBPS, meta-analytic, cross-sectional, and time-lagged models (with and without a lagged dependent variable as a control). We highlight the theoretical and methodological implications of the findings for HR systems research.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSocial Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (#430-2014-00383)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Applied Psychologyen_US
dc.subjecthuman resource managementen_US
dc.subjectleadershipen_US
dc.subjectemployee satisfactionen_US
dc.subjectcustomer satisfactionen_US
dc.subjectendogeneity,en_US
dc.subjectlongitudinalen_US
dc.subjectcovariate balanced propensity scoreen_US
dc.titleMaking Stronger Causal Inferences: Accounting for Selection Bias in Associations Between High Performance Work Systems, Leadership, and Employee and Customer Satisfactionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/apl0000315


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