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dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorPohler, Dionne
dc.contributor.authorWillness, Chelsea
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-23T15:14:29Z
dc.date.available2018-07-23T15:14:29Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-04
dc.identifier.citationSchmidt, J. A., Pohler, D., & Willness, C. R. (2018). Strategic HR system differentiation between jobs: The effects on firm performance and employee outcomes. Human Resource Management, 57(1), 65-81. https://doi.org/10.1002/hrm.21836en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/9040
dc.descriptionThis is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Schmidt, J. A., Pohler, D., & Willness, C. R. (2018). Strategic HR system differentiation between jobs: The effects on firm performance and employee outcomes. Human Resource Management, 57(1), 65-81, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/hrm.21836. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research was to understand the extent to which firms apply different human resource management systems to different occupations within the same organization (HR differentiation), and how this influences both firm and employee outcomes. We conducted two studies pertaining to these questions. The first study was based on data collected from managers and the results showed that firms differentiate their HR investments based on the strategic value of occupations, which was further associated with the human capital of those occupations; differentiation in human capital was also associated with firm performance. The second study was based on data obtained from non-management employees. The findings of this study indicated that employees who were recipients of less HR system investment had lower fairness perceptions, which were further associated with turnover intentions and organizational citizenship behavior. Although the evidence from these studies suggests that firms may realize benefits from HR differentiation, managers should carefully consider how to balance the effects of differentiation on firm performance and employee well-being before implementing such systems.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded in part by the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (#430-2014-00383).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherHuman Resource Managementen_US
dc.subjecthuman resource managementen_US
dc.subjecthigh performance work systemsen_US
dc.subjecthuman capitalen_US
dc.subjectturnoveren_US
dc.subjectfairness perceptionsen_US
dc.subjectorganizational citizenship behavioren_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Strategic HR System Differentiation on Firm Performance and Employee Outcomesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hrm.21836


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