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dc.contributor.authorMoulin, A.
dc.contributor.authorIrvine, B.
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-29T19:25:05Z
dc.date.available2018-08-29T19:25:05Z
dc.date.issued2004-02-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/9639
dc.description.abstractA field study was established in 2000, near Brandon Manitoba, to determine the effect of tillage and crop on soil physical and biological properties. Most soil physical and biological properties were not affected by tillage system or current year crop when sampled in the fall after harvest. The proportion of large (38 to 68.8 mm diameter) dry sieved aggregates increased under low compared to high intensities of tillage. Aggregate stability increased with increasing concentration of organic carbon. The effect of high and low intensity tillage over one or two years, after 9 years in zero tillage, on soil organic carbon, physical properties and fertility was not significant.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSoils and Crops Workshop
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/*
dc.subjectmineralizable nitrogenen_US
dc.subjectamino sugar testen_US
dc.subjectaggregate stabilityen_US
dc.subjectpeaen_US
dc.subjectcanolaen_US
dc.subjectflaxen_US
dc.subjectwheaten_US
dc.titleEffect of rotation and short-term tillage on soil quality after long-term zero tillageen_US
dc.typePoster Presentationen_US
dc.description.versionNon-Peer Reviewed


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada