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dc.contributor.authorJefferson, P.
dc.contributor.authorPearse, G.
dc.contributor.authorPastl, R.
dc.contributor.authorLyon, G.
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-31T00:02:08Z
dc.date.available2018-08-31T00:02:08Z
dc.date.issued2002-02-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/9754
dc.description.abstractForages could provide annual crop producers with a cash hay crop as a viable option in rotation. However, traditional perennial forage crop species that are difficult to establish and left in for many years are not the best option for short rotations of forage (1-3 years) and annual crops. Short-lived grass species that establish quickly and produce more forage for one to three years would provide traditional crop producers with a cash crop that would fit in their crop rotation system. New annual crops have not been tested as companion crops for establishment of grasses with high seedling vigour. The objective of the project is to determine the establishment success (risk) and first year production of fast-establishing forage grasses as affected by soil zone, companion crop, and legume associate.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSoils and Crops Workshop
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/*
dc.titleEstablishment of short rotation forage cropsen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.description.versionNon-Peer Reviewed


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada