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dc.contributor.authorUlrich, D.
dc.contributor.authorBrandt, S.A.
dc.contributor.authorLafond, G.P.
dc.contributor.authorMalhi, S.S.
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, A.M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-01T03:59:27Z
dc.date.available2018-09-01T03:59:27Z
dc.date.issued2002-02-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/9790
dc.description.abstractSeveral new canola varieties have much higher yield potential than those grown in the past. For example, the yield potential of highest yielding varieties listed in the Varieties of Grain Crops booklet for 2001, published by Saskatchewan Agriculture and Food are as much as 35% greater than for the check variety AC Excel. One question that arises is whether such varieties require greater inputs of fertilizer nutrients, particularly nitrogen (N), to realize optimum economic returns.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSoils and Crops Workshop
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/*
dc.subjecteconomic returnen_US
dc.subjecthybriden_US
dc.subjectopen pollinateden_US
dc.titleNitrogen response and nitrogen use efficiency of high yielding canola cultivarsen_US
dc.typePoster Presentationen_US
dc.description.versionNon-Peer Reviewed


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada