Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMcKenzie, Marciaen_US
dc.creatorAnderson, Vinceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-03T22:28:00Z
dc.date.available2013-01-03T22:28:00Z
dc.date.created2011-09en_US
dc.date.issued2012-02-21en_US
dc.date.submittedSeptember 2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2011-09-255en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis disseminates a study investigating the contexts and personal movements connected to social-ecological justice learning, experienced by three student-activists throughout their lives. Woven from a range of theoretical orientations, the study’s framework aims to articulate a foundational basis for socio-ecological justice learning. The central subject of the framework is the situated “mind/brain/body” learner – “in motion and in transition” – negotiating intersubjective experiences within influential social, cultural, and ecological contexts (Biesta, 1999; Boler, 1999; Ellsworth, 2005; Lave and Wenger, 1991; McKenzie, 2008; Weis and Fine, 2003). In the life-course of the learner, there are many significant lived experiences through which meaning and value emerge in relation to socio-ecological justice. These experiences of the learning self (Ellsworth, 2005) may serve to support or obstruct socio-ecological justice advocacy. Extending from these foundations, the qualitative study sought – through “narrative learning” (Goodson et al., 2010) and “collective witnessing” (Boler, 1999) – to bring past learning and newly emerging reflection into a collective conversation of the way socio-ecological justice has come into presence in the lives of the three student-activists. To this end the study’s aims are: i) engage in a participatory narrative process in order for participants to explore, witness, and better understand their own previous learning experiences, meaning, and values in relation to socio-ecological justice; ii) through this process, engage participants in current learning about themselves, each other, and their socio-ecological actions; and iii) contribute to the literature on socio-ecological justice learning, particularly on collaborative processes of self-reflection as a potential vehicle for contributing to socio-ecological learning. The study’s methodology adapts a heuristic research model elucidated by Clark Moustakas (1990) through incorporating attributes outlined in a participatory action research (PAR) framework.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental educationen_US
dc.subjectsocio-ecological justiceen_US
dc.subjectembodied learningen_US
dc.subjectcollective witnessingen_US
dc.subjectpedagogical implicationsen_US
dc.titleInvestigating learning of the embodied self in motion : implications for socio-ecological justice educationen_US
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Foundationsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundationsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcVittie, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHart, Paulen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record