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dc.contributor.advisorNelson, Brenten_US
dc.creatordeTombe, Jonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-03T22:32:12Z
dc.date.available2013-01-03T22:32:12Z
dc.date.created2012-08en_US
dc.date.issued2012-08-29en_US
dc.date.submittedAugust 2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-08-562en_US
dc.description.abstractJerome McGann has explained the functioning of text by appealing to systems theory, explaining that reading is an autopoietic process that operates as a feedback loop co-dependent with the reader. He uses this idea as a starting point in a critique of hierarchical methods of digital markup, such as TEI. By forcing the structure of the text to conform to a formula of ordered content objects, the autopoietic functionality is lost and, since the text can no longer be said to operate in the same way, the reader's engagement is irreparably altered. In his essay “Marking Texts of Many Dimensions,” McGann calls for the development of digital tools that would allow for markup that preserves the ambiguity of language and, therefore, the autopoietic nature of text. Though such tools do not yet exist, something of McGann's vision can be realized by modifying one's notion of the process of digitization. If the entire movement of text from printed object to on-screen rendering is understood as an autopoietic system, the engagement that McGann desires can still be achieved using the common and open tools available today. My work digitizing MS Sloane 3961, William Courten's seventeenth-century financial records, demonstrates this. The process I followed can be read as an autopoietic system, despite my use of TEI in the marking of the text. By conceiving of the system as the reader/editor's interaction with successive iterations of the text, rather than with textual elements and bibliographic cues, the reader/editor is made aware of the inherent ambiguities and is forced to actively read and engage the ambiguity in pursuit of a digital text. The autopoietic functionality is introduced in the iterative nature of the process, in that iterations of the text are read and understood in the light of previous and subsequent iterations of the text. The rendered text becomes the record of the decisions that led to that iteration and representative of the numerous iterations that preceded it and surround it. This is seen in the solutions developed to effectively digitize and represent Courten's cipher.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectdigitalen_US
dc.subjecthumanitiesen_US
dc.subjectmanuscripten_US
dc.subjectdigitizationen_US
dc.subjectmarkupen_US
dc.subjectteien_US
dc.subjectauopoiesisen_US
dc.subjectpoiesisen_US
dc.subjectprocessen_US
dc.subjectreadingen_US
dc.subjecteditingen_US
dc.subjecttextualityen_US
dc.subjectiterationen_US
dc.titleDigital textuality, autopoietic editing, and the Courten MS.en_US
thesis.degree.departmentEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMuri, Allisonen_US


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