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dc.creatorFerguson, Josh-Wadeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-03T22:32:26Z
dc.date.available2013-01-03T22:32:26Z
dc.date.created2012-08en_US
dc.date.issued2012-10-14en_US
dc.date.submittedAugust 2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-08-579en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper is a study of how the blues can be understood as an avenue to express traumatic experience through various cultural signifiers, which allows for community to develop between those who can recognise the signs. Part of the trauma of the blues is the loss of home and the nostalgia for that lost place. Ultimately, through the use of trauma theory, the blues can be understood as a testimony of traumatic experience that asks for an attentive audience. To support this assertion, this paper discusses two of Elmore James’s songs, “Dust my Broom” and “I Believe,” in his search for a way to “go back home.”en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectTrauma and the bluesen_US
dc.subjectElmore Jamesen_US
dc.subject"I Believe"en_US
dc.subject"Dust my Broom"en_US
dc.subjectTraumaen_US
dc.subjectBluesen_US
dc.subjectBlues Nostalgiaen_US
dc.subjectAfrican American experienceen_US
dc.titleSearching for Community and Place in the Blues : Getting Back Home in Elmore James’s “Dust My Broom” and “I Believe”en_US
thesis.degree.departmentEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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