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dc.contributor.advisorKorinek, Valerie J.en_US
dc.creatorStanley, Heatheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-12T12:00:10Z
dc.date.available2013-12-12T12:00:10Z
dc.date.created2013-11en_US
dc.date.issued2013-12-11en_US
dc.date.submittedNovember 2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-11-1303en_US
dc.description.abstractSex and sexuality are embodied experiences that are highly constructed by society. Sexual acts are subject to varied historical meanings, both dominant and subversive, which change over time and space. This dissertation explores how embodied heterosexual married sexual experiences were constructed for, and by, women in the immediate postwar era (1946-1966) and how that sexuality interacted with related social paradigms such as gender roles, motherhood, and femininity within English Canada. Using the body as a lens, this dissertation explores how three main sites of authoritative discourse attempted to police postwar sexual bodies through the creation of ideal, or Leviathan, bodies and associated systems of encoded knowledges and mores called “body politics.” The first case study examines the medicalized body, using the Canadian Medical Association Journal demonstrating how mothers were constructed as the keystones of their families; it reveals the intimate ties between familial gender and sexual role deviance and reproductive illnesses in women’s bodies. The second case study examines how the Anglican, United and Roman Catholic Churches reframed sex as sacramental for English Canadian married couples encouraging them to engage in sexual coitus to both strengthen their marriages and renew their spiritual connection to God. The third case study uses I Love Lucy to interrogate how mass media created and reflected postwar sexual and gender norms while simultaneously subverting them, generating a carnivalesque situation of tightly contained deviance. This dissertation then moves on to examine how the discourses of the previous three chapters affected actual women as demonstrated by a series of eighteen interviews with women who married between 1939 and 1966. The oral histories establish that actual corporeal bodies were at best distorted, or “fun house,” mirrors that only ever reflected imperfect copies of the ideal bodies they were supposed to emulate. In addition to making significant contributions to the historiographies of each of the case studies contained therein, this dissertation adds new knowledges about the ways that “normal” bodies work throughout history, creating simultaneous continuity and change, as well as how sexuality and gender norms are intimately connected within the realm of the body.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectsexualityen_US
dc.subjecthistoryen_US
dc.subjectgenderen_US
dc.subjecthistory of medicineen_US
dc.subjecthistory of religionen_US
dc.subjectmedia historyen_US
dc.subjectoral historyen_US
dc.subjectfemininityen_US
dc.subjectdiscourseen_US
dc.subjectbodyen_US
dc.subjectbaby boomen_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectsexen_US
dc.subjectmarriageen_US
dc.titleTHE DOUBLE BED: SEX, HETEROSEXUAL MARRIAGE AND THE BODY IN POSTWAR ENGLISH CANADA, 1946-1966en_US
thesis.degree.departmentHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDyck, Erikaen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMeyers, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWaiser, Billen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberStephanson, Rayen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberStrong-Boag, Veronicaen_US


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