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dc.contributor.advisorR, Patrick J.en_US
dc.creatorGuenther, Brenten_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-03T12:00:13Z
dc.date.available2014-10-03T12:00:13Z
dc.date.created2014-08en_US
dc.date.issued2014-10-02en_US
dc.date.submittedAugust 2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2014-08-1660en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch has shown links between high levels of teacher self-efficacy and increased student achievement. Theorists and educational researchers have identified conditions and resources that increase teacher self-efficacy. Building on existing research, this quantitative study used data from 46 teacher respondents in one Saskatchewan school division. The purpose of the study was to examine teacher self-efficacy and its relationship to teachers’ perceptions of their working conditions. An online questionnaire, based on the Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES) and the Teaching, Empowering, Leading and Learning (TELL) Survey, was used to collect the data. The mode of data analysis consisted of frequency counts (means and standard deviations) for the descriptive items relating to levels of self-efficacy and perceptions of working conditions. Non-parametric methods were used to measure significance and level of differences among variables, and Spearman’s rho correlations were employed to identify the level of significance of relationships between and among the dimensions and items of teacher self-efficacy and teacher working conditions. A significant correlation was found between the two major constructs of teacher self-efficacy and teachers’ perceptions of their working conditions, and strong correlations were also found between specific dimensions of teacher self-efficacy and dimensions of working conditions. Teacher levels of self-efficacy were predominantly in the moderate and high levels, and teacher leadership was rated highest among working conditions variables. Time availability was rated the lowest of all working conditions, and was found to be significantly related to the teacher self-efficacy dimensions of classroom management and instructional strategies. Further research, using student achievement data and a greater number of participants, may clarify how teacher self-efficacy and working conditions affect student achievement.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectteacher self-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectteacher working conditionsen_US
dc.subjectperceptionen_US
dc.subjectteachersen_US
dc.subjectSaskatchewanen_US
dc.titleTeacher self-efficacy and its relationship to teachers' perceptions of their working conditionsen_US
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDray, Normanen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBurgess, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberClaypool, Timen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMolnar, Timen_US


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