Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorElshorbagy, Aminen_US
dc.creatorAlam, Md Shahabulen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-09T12:00:16Z
dc.date.available2015-01-09T12:00:16Z
dc.date.created2014-12en_US
dc.date.issued2015-01-08en_US
dc.date.submittedDecember 2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2014-12-1865en_US
dc.description.abstractIntensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves are among the standard design tools for various engineering applications, such as storm water management systems. The current practice is to use IDF curves based on historical extreme precipitation quantiles. A warming climate, however, might change the extreme precipitation quantiles represented by the IDF curves, emphasizing the need for updating the IDF curves used for the design of urban storm water management systems in different parts of the world, including Canada. This study attempts to construct the future IDF curves for Saskatoon, Canada, under possible climate change scenarios. For this purpose, LARS-WG, a stochastic weather generator, is used to spatially downscale the daily precipitation projected by Global Climate Models (GCMs) from coarse grid resolution to the local point scale. The stochastically downscaled daily precipitation realizations were further disaggregated into ensemble hourly and sub-hourly (as fine as 5-minute) precipitation series, using a disaggregation scheme developed using the K-nearest neighbor (K-NN) technique. This two-stage modeling framework (downscaling to daily, then disaggregating to finer resolutions) is applied to construct the future IDF curves in the city of Saskatoon. The sensitivity of the K-NN disaggregation model to the number of nearest neighbors (i.e. window size) is evaluated during the baseline period (1961-1990). The optimal window size is assigned based on the performance in reproducing the historical IDF curves by the K-NN disaggregation models. Two optimal window sizes are selected for the K-NN hourly and sub-hourly disaggregation models that would be appropriate for the hydrological system of Saskatoon. By using the simulated hourly and sub-hourly precipitation series and the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution, future changes in the IDF curves and associated uncertainties are quantified using a large ensemble of projections obtained for the Canadian and British GCMs (CanESM2 and HadGEM2-ES) based on three Representative Concentration Pathways; RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 available from CMIP5 – the most recent product of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The constructed IDF curves are then compared with the ones constructed using another method based on a genetic programming technique. The results show that the sign and the magnitude of future variations in extreme precipitation quantiles are sensitive to the selection of GCMs and/or RCPs, and the variations seem to become intensified towards the end of the 21st century. Generally, the relative change in precipitation intensities with respect to the historical intensities for CMIP5 climate models (e.g., CanESM2: RCP4.5) is less than those for CMIP3 climate models (e.g., CGCM3.1: B1), which may be due to the inclusion of climate policies (i.e., adaptation and mitigation) in CMIP5 climate models. The two-stage downscaling-disaggregation method enables quantification of uncertainty due to natural internal variability of precipitation, various GCMs and RCPs, and downscaling methods. In general, uncertainty in the projections of future extreme precipitation quantiles increases for short durations and for long return periods. The two-stage method adopted in this study and the GP method reconstruct the historical IDF curves quite successfully during the baseline period (1961-1990); this suggests that these methods can be applied to efficiently construct IDF curves at the local scale under future climate scenarios. The most notable precipitation intensification in Saskatoon is projected to occur with shorter storm duration, up to one hour, and longer return periods of more than 25 years.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectIntensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curvesen_US
dc.subjectclimate change, stochastic weather generatorsen_US
dc.subjectK-nearest neighbors (K-NN)en_US
dc.subjectGeneralized Extreme Value (GEV) distributionen_US
dc.subjectSaskatoon.en_US
dc.titleConstruction of the Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) Curves under Climate Changeen_US
thesis.degree.departmentCivil and Geological Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMazurek, Kerryen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKhaliq, Naveeden_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHawkes, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberShook, Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberIreson, Andrewen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record