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dc.contributor.advisorClaypool, Timen_US
dc.creatorSacher, Seanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-24T12:00:16Z
dc.date.available2015-07-24T12:00:16Z
dc.date.created2015-06en_US
dc.date.issued2015-07-23en_US
dc.date.submittedJune 2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2015-06-2093en_US
dc.description.abstractSelf-rated religiosity has been studied alongside intelligence for nearly 100 years. The predominant finding is a negative relationship between measures of self-rated religiosity and individual measures of intelligence. That is, as intelligence increases, the degree of self-rated religiosity decreases; as intelligence scores decrease, self-rated religiosity tends to increase. Spirituality has been studied intermittently as a separate theoretical construct since the 1970’s and there has been a recent empirical drive to consider and refer to these concepts separately. Valid and reliable measures of intelligence have not yet been examined alongside empirically validated, individual, self-rated measures of spirituality. In this study, 44 undergraduate students from the University of Saskatchewan completed the Shipley-2 abbreviated test of intelligence and the Spiritual Well Being Questionnaire (SWBQ). Due to the nature of religiosity relative to spirituality, as well as individual differences in characteristic propensities to engage in logical reasoning, it was hypothesized that when compared to past research examining measured intelligence relative to self-endorsed measures of religiosity, a relatively weak relationship would be observed. The nature and strength of the relationship between self-rated measures of spirituality and measured intelligence was nearly identical to a recent meta-analysis study examining the relationship between self-rated religiosity and measured intelligence. However, a relatively strong negative relationship was observed between the transcendent factor of the SWBQ – the factor most closely associated with notions of a God, religion, or religiosity – and intelligence. This finding supports the hypothesis and suggests that perhaps it is the notion of a God or other sentient being that is driving or inflating the widely observed negative relationship between self-rated religiosity and intelligence.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectspirituality, intelligence, religiosity, analytic, intuitive, reasoning, importance, orthodox, spiritual, religious, abstract, belief, counterintuitiveen_US
dc.titleAn investigation of the link between spirituality and intelligenceen_US
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychology and Special Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool and Counselling Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMorrison, Dirken_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKalyn, Brendaen_US


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