Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMartin, Stephanieen_US
dc.creatorPawluk, Oliviaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-25T12:00:11Z
dc.date.available2015-06-25T12:00:11Z
dc.date.created2015-10en_US
dc.date.issued2015-06-24en_US
dc.date.submittedOctober 2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2015-10-2062en_US
dc.description.abstractInvestigating how a media literacy education intervention tool affects women’s self-objectification, self-esteem, and body satisfaction was the first purpose of the study. Secondly, participants’ perceptions of media literacy education interventions and of media imagery were explored. Objectification theory was used as a framework for understanding media imagery effects. One hundred and eighty three participants completed the online study. Participants were mainly recruited from the undergraduate Psychology participant pool at the University of Saskatchewan. The control group (n = 99) viewed a compilation of magazine advertisements and completed measures of self-objectification (i.e., the Self-Objectification Questionnaire), self-esteem (i.e., the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale), body satisfaction (i.e., the Body Image States Scale), and media attitudes (i.e., the Media Attitudes Questionnaire). The intervention group (n= 84) received a media literacy education intervention tool (i.e., the Evolution video, by Dove), viewed magazine advertisements, and completed the same measures of self-objectification, self-esteem, body satisfaction, and media attitudes. The intervention group also completed open-ended questions about their perceptions of the intervention. Analyses included independent t-tests, Pearson correlations, descriptive statistics, and thematic analysis. Results indicated no significant differences between the control and intervention conditions for self-esteem, self-objectification, body-satisfaction, and media attitudes. Although significant correlations were found, most were in the direction that did not align with the predictions. A descriptive analysis indicated that women’s perceptions of themselves are negatively affected by media material. The thematic analysis demonstrated that viewing the intervention was both positively and negatively perceived. Results and limitations of the current study are discussed. Implications for practice and future research are also identifieden_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectmedia imagery, media literacy, body image, objectification theoryen_US
dc.titleBeauty redefined: Exploring media literacy perceptions and body image in young womenen_US
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychology and Special Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool and Counselling Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcIntyre, Laureenen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record