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dc.contributor.advisorAkkerman, Abrahamen_US
dc.creatorMacIntyre, Stephen Josephen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-01T18:52:05Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:22:55Z
dc.date.available2007-01-15T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:22:55Z
dc.date.created2006-12en_US
dc.date.issued2006-12-22en_US
dc.date.submittedDecember 2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-01012007-185205en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study proposes an application of Talen’s (2003) methodological framework for assessing neighbourhood-level (i.e., non-motorised mode) accessibility, and offers recommendations for improving non-motorized transportation (NMT) accessibility to enhance multimodal integration between bicycles and buses in contemporary North American suburban neighbourhoods. Accessibility (or "access”) is defined as the average travel time or distance between a given origin and destination along the shortest available street network route. The study considers characteristics of the transportation network such as available route directness, facilities, and transit service provision to determine their impacts on bicycle access. A further methodology for comparing bicycle versus bus modal efficiencies within suburban contexts is developed and applied to the case study. A review of approaches designed to promote bicycling while discouraging personal automobile use provides a toolbox of proven treatments that are applied to a case study of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan – a city of approximately 200,000 people. The approach provides a process that can be used by city or transit planners to identify neighbourhoods that lack sufficient access and apply treatments that improve bicycle accessibility and bicycle-transit integration. Results suggest existing potential for the bicycle as an access mode within contemporary suburban neighbourhood transportation networks. The case study supports the notion that suburban bicycle-bus integration could be used as a viable alternative to automobiles for daily home-to-node activity trips, and raises questions about the current allocation of public transit service to suburban routes within the context of the case study. Discussion and conclusions suggest directions for future research in this field of sustainable urban transportation planning.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectbicycleen_US
dc.subjectbusen_US
dc.subjectmulti-modalen_US
dc.subjectnon-motorizeden_US
dc.subjectaccessen_US
dc.subjectbikeen_US
dc.subjectaccessibilityen_US
dc.subjectsaskatoonen_US
dc.titleEvaluating bicycle accessibility and bike-bus integration infrastructure : Saskatoon, SK, 2006en_US
thesis.degree.departmentGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKowalski, Kenten_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGuo, Xulinen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDrinkwater, Donald T.en_US


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