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dc.contributor.advisorMould, Daviden_US
dc.creatorMiller, Jordan Williamen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-28T23:57:36Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:26:01Z
dc.date.available2011-03-09T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:26:01Z
dc.date.created2010-03en_US
dc.date.issued2010-03en_US
dc.date.submittedMarch 2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-02282010-235736en_US
dc.description.abstractThere currently exist several techniques for selecting and combining images from a digital image library into a single image so that the result meets certain prespecified visual criteria. Image mosaic methods, first explored by Connors and Trivedi[18], arrange library images according to some tiling arrangement, often a regular grid, so that the combination of images, when viewed as a whole, resembles some input target image. Other techniques, such as Autocollage of Rother et al.[78], seek only to combine images in an interesting and visually pleasing manner, according to certain composition principles, without attempting to approximate any target image. Each of these techniques provide a myriad of creative options for artists who wish to combine several levels of meaning into a single image or who wish to exploit the meaning and symbolism contained in each of a large set of images through an efficient and easy process. We first examine the most notable and successful of these methods, and summarize the advantages and limitations of each. We then formulate a set of goals for an image collage system that combines the advantages of these methods while addressing and mitigating the drawbacks. Particularly, we propose a system for creating photocollages that approximate a target image as an aggregation of smaller images, chosen from a large library, so that interesting visual correspondences between images are exploited. In this way, we allow users to create collages in which multiple layers of meaning are encoded, with meaningful visual links between each layer. In service of this goal, we ensure that the images used are as large as possible and are combined in such a way that boundaries between images are not immediately apparent, as in Autocollage. This has required us to apply a multiscale approach to searching and comparing images from a large database, which achieves both speed and accuracy. We also propose a new framework for color post-processing, and propose novel techniques for decomposing images according to object and texture information.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectcomputer graphicsen_US
dc.subjectarten_US
dc.subjectcollageen_US
dc.subjectnon-photorealistic renderingen_US
dc.subjectmosaicen_US
dc.titleAccurate and discernible photocollagesen_US
thesis.degree.departmentComputer Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComputer Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDick, Raineren_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKim, Teden_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKeil, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEramian, Marken_US


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