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dc.contributor.advisorLawson, Karen L.en_US
dc.creatorRobertson-Frey, Tanyaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-03-23T13:57:58Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:27:10Z
dc.date.available2005-03-23T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:27:10Z
dc.date.created2005-03en_US
dc.date.issued2005-03-22en_US
dc.date.submittedMarch 2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-03232005-135758en_US
dc.description.abstractPast research has demonstrated that there are numerous medical and psychological consequences when a woman with an eating disorder becomes pregnant. There has been a paucity of research, however, examining the attitudes towards pregnancy of women with body image issues/eating disorders and how these attitudes subsequently affect intentions to become pregnant. The present study examines intentions to become pregnant among a sample of women ranging in level of body image concerns using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) as a framework (Ajzen and Fishbein, 1980). Two hundred and forty-two females from an introductory psychology class completed a questionnaire, including the Eating Disorder Inventory (Garner, 1991) and specific scales targeting the components of the TRA developed for the present study. As expected, all TRA precursors to intentions were positively correlated with intentions to become pregnant, while contrary to predictions, body image was not correlated with intentions. In partial support of the TRA, a multiple regression analysis revealed that, for all participants, the subjective norm of pregnancy and perceived benefits of pregnancy were predictive of intentions to become pregnant. Perceived costs of pregnancy, however, evidenced no ability to predict intentions to become pregnant. Although results failed to support the prediction that those with high body image concerns would indicate a lower intention to become pregnant, significant differences among those with high versus low body image concerns did emerge. Specifically, participants with high body image concerns reported greater perceived costs of pregnancy as well as a greater likelihood of engaging in weight control behaviours during pregnancy. Implications, as well as practical applications of these findings are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjecttheory of reasoned actionen_US
dc.subjectbody imageen_US
dc.subjectpregnancyen_US
dc.titleBody image and pregnancy : application of the theory of reasoned actionen_US
thesis.degree.departmentPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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