Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorReed, Maureenen_US
dc.creatorMcBain, Lesley Annen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-03-23T10:44:34Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:27:10Z
dc.date.available2006-03-23T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:27:10Z
dc.date.created2006-02en_US
dc.date.issued2006-02-24en_US
dc.date.submittedFebruary 2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-03232006-104434en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 1944, the Government of Saskatchewan created the Northern Administrative District (NAD), which established Northern Saskatchewan as a spatial entity within the provincial milieu. Attention was focused on modernizing the region, and public health nursing became one of the first state-sponsored institutions to be introduced by the provincial government. By examining the day-to-day activities of nurses who worked at remote nursing outposts in Northern Saskatchewan between 1944 and 1957 and beyond, this research examines the complex internal factors involved in region-making. Nurses lived and worked amongst their patients in small remote communities, thus making them effective vehicles for promoting modernization principles through preventative and educations programs. Despite the government’s intention to modernize Northern Saskatchewan, a colonial relationship emerged between the region and the rest of the province. This situation left nurses in a confusing and often difficult position, because the institution behind initiatives to modernize the region was also their employer to whom they had certain obligations. Furthermore, the colonial attitude towards the region also extended to the nursing stations and the nurses, which often frustrated their attempts to provide medical care. As such, the small cadre of nurses played an ambiguous role, both as agents of modernization, but also opponents of its egregious effects. The research examines the role of nursing in region-making through two types of geography: A geography of region-making where the literature focuses on the formal process of institutionalization, and a geography of social life, where the emerging literature on the geography of nursing provides an entry point. This two-part approach provides an opportunity to use different lenses to view the processes involved in shaping Northern Saskatchewan as it emerged as a distinct northern place within Canada.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjecthealthcare in northern and remote regionsen_US
dc.subjectnorthern nursingen_US
dc.subjecttelelehealthen_US
dc.subjecttelemedicineen_US
dc.subjectpublic healthen_US
dc.titleProviding care in divided space : nursing in Northern Saskatchewan, 1944-1957 and beyonden_US
thesis.degree.departmentGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPeters, Evelynen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberNaqvi, Kimen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCoates, Kenen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBiggs, C. Lesleyen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBell, Scott M.en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record