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dc.contributor.advisorNoonan, Brianen_US
dc.creatorOwre, Keithen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-04-03T17:23:18Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:28:09Z
dc.date.available2006-04-06T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:28:09Z
dc.date.created2006-02en_US
dc.date.issued2006-02-28en_US
dc.date.submittedFebruary 2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-04032006-172318en_US
dc.description.abstractThis investigation of teachers computer use prompted by a 1999 Provincial Assessment finding that students were performing below Provincial expectations in use of the World Wide Web / Internet and identification of teachers as students greatest source of computer knowledge. It was found that the majority of teachers have the necessary knowledge and skills to use computers in the classroom, but teachers predominantly used computers for personal and general purposes. It was also found that teachers represent a large source of influence on their colleagues’ computer knowledge and skills. This influence, defined through the construct of collective efficacy, was found to differ between schools with higher and lower levels of collective efficacy in their perceptions of the image portrayed by using the World Wide Web / Internet in the classroom. Teachers in schools with high and median levels of collective efficacy were found to differ significantly from teachers in schools with lower levels of collective efficacy in the potential status a teacher may obtain within their school from using the World Wide Web / Internet. Additionally this study offers support for Venkatesh and Davis (2000) theoretical proposition that the image construct is less susceptible to the influence of experience an individual may have with a particular computer application. However due to small sample size of this study these results must be interpreted cautiously.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectcollective efficacyen_US
dc.subjectteachersen_US
dc.subjecttechnology acceptanceen_US
dc.titleThe effect of collective effficacy on teachers' technology acceptanceen_US
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychology and Special Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychology and Special Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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