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dc.contributor.advisorPahwa, Punamen_US
dc.creatorBryce, Rhondaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T20:27:36Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:28:25Z
dc.date.available2012-04-12T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:28:25Z
dc.date.created2011-04en_US
dc.date.issued2011-04en_US
dc.date.submittedApril 2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-04072011-202736en_US
dc.description.abstractStatistics Canada data indicates that between 2002 and 2006, the late stillbirth incidence (at or beyond 28 weeks gestation) was 3.0/1000 and 4.0/1000 among Canadian and Saskatchewan births respectively. This difference questions the characteristics and associations of late losses in our province; this work aims to assess late Saskatchewan stillbirths in regard to incidence, causes, characteristics, and area-level factors. Accessing Vital Statistics cases (1987 to 2007, n=1119), descriptive statistics and incidence were examined utilizing Chi-square testing and Poisson regression. Associations between variables were evaluated by log-linear models. Area-level factors relating to incidence within census divisions were explored using Poisson regression. Although some variation existed by time and region, women were most often less than 35 years, of moderate parity, non-Aboriginal, had no previous stillbirths, and were not carrying multiple fetuses. Approximately half of the losses were preterm and half were inadequately grown. Incidence per 1000 births differed significantly for Saskatchewan (3.86) and Canada (3.43) with only Canada declining. Several division values were also higher than Saskatoon’s Division 11. Associations were seen between characteristics; most notably the combination of Aboriginality, increased maternal age, and large-for-gestational-age appeared over-represented compared to live births. Regions with higher proportions of Aboriginal preschoolers or land area with herbicide application had higher incidence (RR = 1.53 and 1.55, p-value less than 0.001). Further work is required to understand Saskatchewan’s lack of decline, what can be done about areas where incidence is increased, the significance of the associated characteristics as actual risk factors, and how Aboriginality and herbicide influence risk at the individual level.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectSaskatchewanen_US
dc.subjectrisk factorsen_US
dc.subjectfetal deathen_US
dc.subjectstillbirthen_US
dc.titleDemographic risk factors for late pregnancy stillbirth in Saskatchewan womenen_US
thesis.degree.departmentCommunity Health and Epidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunity Health and Epidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDe Padua, Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMpofu, Debbieen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJanzen, Bonnieen_US


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