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dc.contributor.advisorMaaka, Rogeren_US
dc.creatorMease, Anne Marieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-15T16:32:47Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:29:23Z
dc.date.available2010-04-22T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:29:23Z
dc.date.created2009-04en_US
dc.date.issued2009-04-22en_US
dc.date.submittedApril 2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-04152009-163247en_US
dc.description.abstractIn July 1997 Selkirk First Nation Citizens or Selkirk First Nation Peoples in the community of Pelly Crossing, Yukon signed the Selkirk First Nation Final Land Claims Agreement (Modern Day Treaty) and the Selkirk First Nation Self-Government Agreement with the Government of Yukon and the Government of Canada. Prior to 1997 they were under the auspices of the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs (DIAND) and did not have the autonomy to create policy and law for land management. Rather, they were required to adhere to regulations that were mandated by the Yukon Wildlife Act and other institutions created by the Yukon or Federal Governments. The methodology employed in this study was aimed at providing an accurate assessment of change while at the same time ensuring that Selkirk First Nation perspectives remained uppermost. To achieve this, community and personal insights were gained through interviews, family group discussions and the observation of community activities. To ensure that these perspectives were positioned in an accurate historical and political context an examination of public, private, and government records were also undertaken. This research has provided the platform upon which I formed my conceptualizations that Selkirk First Nation Peoples are benefiting both culturally and traditionally. The significance of this research will provide alternatives for other First Nations who pursue land claims and who are building their hunting and fishing laws or Wildlife Acts upon cultural values and traditional pursuits that are distinct from those mandated federally, provincially, or territorially. It is also anticipated that First Nations who are in the process of negotiating Comprehensive Land Claims Agreements acknowledge that certainty regarding Aboriginal rights and title go above and beyond what is defined by the dominant Governments and the Courts.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjecthunting and fishingen_US
dc.subjectAboriginal Rights and Titleen_US
dc.subjectland and resource managementen_US
dc.subjectco-managementen_US
dc.titleOnce the land is for certain : the Selkirk First Nation approach to land management, 1997-2007en_US
thesis.degree.departmentNative Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNative Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLaliberte, Ronen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberErvin, Alexander M. (Sandy)en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPoelzer, Gregen_US


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