Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWormith, J. Stephenen_US
dc.creatorHook, Tarah Lynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-05-13T22:06:42Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:30:45Z
dc.date.available2007-05-14T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:30:45Z
dc.date.created2007-05en_US
dc.date.issued2007-05-14en_US
dc.date.submittedMay 2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-05132007-220642en_US
dc.description.abstractIt was hypothesized that the self-esteem instability and emotional reactivity associated with narcissism may be related to the simplicity of cognitive self-representation known as low self-complexity. The relationships among narcissism, self-concept, affect and violent behaviour were investigated in two studies with samples of federally sentenced violent and sexual offenders. In the first study, participants completed personality inventories and a measure of self-complexity, while changes in self-esteem were tracked across two weeks. In the second study, participants completed the same battery of measures as in the first study in addition to several new measures of anger, aggression and previous violent behaviour. Also, official records were consulted to obtain collateral information regarding violent behaviour. Experiences of positive and negative events and the resulting changes in affect and self-esteem were tracked over six weeks. It was expected that self-complexity would mediate reactivity to daily events such that individuals low in self-complexity and high in narcissistic personality traits would report the greatest shifts in self-esteem and emotion. When positive and negative self-complexity were considered separately, some support was found for the hypothesized buffering effect. Generally, higher positive self-complexity was associated with better coping while higher negative self-complexity was associated with less desirable reactions to events. Theoretical and clinical implications of this finding are discussed along with limitations of these studies and suggestions for future research.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectoffendersen_US
dc.subjectaggressionen_US
dc.subjectself-complexityen_US
dc.subjectnarcissismen_US
dc.titleThe role of self-concept and narcissism in aggressionen_US
thesis.degree.departmentPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPresse, Cindyen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHoffman, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberChartier, Brian M.en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record