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dc.contributor.advisorWaiser, William A.en_US
dc.creatorThome, Michael Charlesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-06-28T17:02:39Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:41:04Z
dc.date.available2005-06-29T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:41:04Z
dc.date.created2005-05en_US
dc.date.issued2005-05-30en_US
dc.date.submittedMay 2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-06282005-170239en_US
dc.description.abstractIn September 1905, Frederick W.G. Haultain, Premier of the North-West Territories, was not asked to form the first government of either Saskatchewan or Alberta. Many considered his treatment scandalous, especially since Haultain had distinguished himself during the Territorial period. As the Territorial government’s first leader, Haultain worked tirelessly to provide the region with the services the residences of the other provinces took for granted. Despite these achievements, Haultain was not a good strategic thinker. After 1905, Haultain formed the Provincial Rights Party and served as the first leader of the opposition in Saskatchewan. Haultain retired from politics in 1912 after failing to secure a majority in three successive elections. Haultain’s reputation as an elder statesman developed after his death in 1941. Many scholars have blamed Liberal politicians for Haultain’s marginalization. In reality, by 1905 Haultain had undermined his own base of support by making poor political choices that alienated his supporters. In seeking provincehood for the North-West Territories, Haultain unwisely alienated his Cabinet colleagues whose support was essential to maintaining the Assembly’s confidence in the government. He also failed to build the Provincial Rights Party into a serious alternative to the Liberals because he lacked some important political skills. Haultain failed to enlist any talented individuals to serve along side him in the Assembly. Most importantly, Haultain failed to realize that it was practically impossible to form a government without the support of rural Saskatchewan, and took many positions that alienated farmers. His failure to support reciprocity in 1911 ultimately destroyed his already damaged reputation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectsaskatchewan historyen_US
dc.subjectwestern alienationen_US
dc.subjectprotest partyen_US
dc.subjectsaskatchewan politics and governmenten_US
dc.subjectautonomyen_US
dc.subjectsaskatchewan acten_US
dc.titleHow the West was lost : Frederick Haultain and the foundation of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.departmentHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKitzan, Laurence A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGarcea, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCottrell, Michaelen_US


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