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dc.contributor.advisorKlymyshyn, David M.en_US
dc.creatorKannan, Thirumalaien_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-02T16:04:13Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:41:27Z
dc.date.available2006-07-03T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:41:27Z
dc.date.created2006-06en_US
dc.date.issued2006-06-21en_US
dc.date.submittedJune 2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-07022006-160413en_US
dc.description.abstractSurface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices are key components in RF and IF stages of many electronic systems. A Surface Acoustic wave is a mechanical wave, which is excited on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate, when an alternating electric voltage is applied through a comb-like interdigital transducer (electrodes) patterned on it. Most SAW applications to date have been in the sub-2GHz region, but emerging applications require SAW devices at higher frequencies. The traditional models are inadequate to account for pronounced second order effects at the GHz range and also new microfabrication techniques are required to obtain quality devices as the critical dimensions shrink into the nano-scale range at these frequencies. The finite element method (a numerical method of solving differential equations) has the potential to account for these effects and ever increasing sub-micron processing capabilities of LIGA (X-ray lithography) present a promising outlook for high frequency SAW device modeling and fabrication respectively. A finite element model has been developed using commercial software ANSYS for one port SAW resonators and is presented in this thesis. The one port SAW resonators are generally connected in form of ladder networks to form low-loss SAW filters. The spacing between the electrodes and the velocity of the SAW determine the frequency of operation of these devices. A finite element model has been developed for three different types of SAWdevices namely Rayleigh, leaky and longitudinal leaky SAW (LLSAW). The LLSAW has higher velocity as compared to other two types and hence considered in this work as a good prospect for high frequency SAW devices. A full finite element model could not be solved due to high computing requirements and hence some assumptions were made and the results were validated against published results in the literature. The results indicate that even with simplifying assumptions and approximations FE model provides reasonably accurate results, that can be used in device design. Some of the simulations (in LLSAW based devices) in this work were also done with a view towards using LIGA (X-ray lithography) for fabrication of high frequency devices as they have the capability for high aspect ratios.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectModal and harmonic analysesen_US
dc.subjectAnisotropic piezoelectric substratesen_US
dc.subjectBoundary conditionsen_US
dc.subjectCOM modelen_US
dc.subjectWave propagationen_US
dc.titleFinite element analysis of surface acoustic wave resonatorsen_US
thesis.degree.departmentElectrical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKo, Seok-Bumen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJohanson, Robert E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDodds, David E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberTorvi, David A.en_US


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