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dc.contributor.advisorSelvaraj, Gopalanen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFowler, D. Brianen_US
dc.creatorHoffman, Travis L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-06T10:36:32Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:42:33Z
dc.date.available2013-07-06T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:42:33Z
dc.date.created2006-06en_US
dc.date.issued2006-06en_US
dc.date.submittedJune 2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-07062012-103632en_US
dc.description.abstractFlowering is a critical step in the plant life cycle. If flowering occurs too early or too late, seed production suffers. Flowering is regulated through numerous flowering repressors. As long as these repressors persist, the plant will remain in a vegetative growth stage. Some plants possess two separate genetic pathways, the autonomous pathway and the vernalization pathway, that promote the transition to flowering through stable downregulation of flowering repressors. Once the plant achieves floral competence, it will flower under inductive environmental conditions. In Arabidopsis, FCA is a key autonomous pathway gene, acting with FY to promote the floral transition. Recently, gene sequences resembling FCA were cloned from hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) and designated as WFCA. WFCA shows numerous similarities to the FCA peptide, especially regarding three key regions: two RNA Recognition Motifs and the WW domain. This study seeks to determine if WFCA genes function similar to FCA by determining if they are able to complement the fca-1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana. T1 progeny from an Arabidopsis fca-1 plant transformed with WFCA were grown without vernalization and assayed for the final leaf number (FLN). The late flowering fca-1 control plants bolted with an average FLN of 14.8 while the T1 population had an average FLN of 14.3. Although the numerical difference is slight, the results are statistically significant, and suggest that WFCA genes may have some degree of flowering promotion activity in Arabidopsis. The lack of strong complementation may be due to divergence of the WFCA genes from their Arabidopsis counterparts. With increasing evidence for divergence in flowering promotion between monocot and dicot species, the development of a robust monocot model system appears to be critical to provide a good framework to assist studies of the particular nuances of the monocot flowering process.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectWheaten_US
dc.subjectFloweringen_US
dc.subjectFCAen_US
dc.subjectWFCAen_US
dc.subjectArabidopsisen_US
dc.subjectFloral Transitionen_US
dc.titleToward functional characterization of Triticum aestivum WFCA-coding sequencesen_US
thesis.degree.departmentPlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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