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dc.creatorTokar, Sharon Louiseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-07-13T08:35:57Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:44:31Z
dc.date.available2008-09-14T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:44:31Z
dc.date.created1999en_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.date.submitted1999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-07132007-083557en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Morleyville Methodist Mission located near Morley, Alberta, was occupied from 1873 to 1921 (approximate date of abandonment). The Reverend George McDougall and his son John were responsible for the establishment of the mission. Both men were prominent figures in the history of the settlement and development of Alberta and the Canadian northwest. John was a major participant in the settlement of Treaty 7 and the arrival of the N.W.M.P. in the west. The mission site was excavated over two field seasons in 1984-85 by Dr. Margaret A. Kennedy, now of the University of Saskatchewan. The resultant artifact assemblage contains in excess of 25,000 items, largely in a fragmentary state. Of this number approximately 3,000 artifacts were considered for analysis. The focus of this current research is an examination of the mission's domestic sphere, specifically as it applied to women and Methodism. For the purpose of this research only the categories of "Ceramics", "Other Glass",and "Bottles and Jars" were considered. Though the Morleyville Mission was occupied during the Victorian era, historic literature and documents tell us little of the reality of the domestic sphere at a frontier site. The domestic elaboration of the Victorian era has been well documented. However, whether such elaboration was the case at the mission site was open to some speculation. Therefore, these categories were assessed as providing the most accurate reflection of the domestic life of the mission households. It is believed that the presence and absence of specific ceramic waretypes and the identification of patterned sets will help illuminate this issue. It was hoped that, by using these categories to examine the domestic life of these middle-class Victorian Methodists a more accurate picture of the domestic life of the inhabitants of a mission on the northwest frontier of Canada could be developed. However, it is with caution that I put forth my conclusions for the Morleyville Mission. Though the Archeological evidence does not support my initial objectives, this thesis has succeed in providing important information regarding the domestic lifestyle at the Morleyville Mission and indicates that other factors were active at the site.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectJohn McDougall (missionary)en_US
dc.subjectDomestic lifeen_US
dc.subjectMethodismen_US
dc.subjectReverend George McDougall (missionary)en_US
dc.subjectWomen missionariesen_US
dc.subjectMissions - Northwest frontier - Canadaen_US
dc.subjectMorleyville Methodist Mission - Albertaen_US
dc.titleAn examination of domestic life at the Morleyville Mission, Morley, Alberta (EhPq-6)en_US
thesis.degree.departmentAnthropology and Archaeologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology and Archaeologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMeyer, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLinnamae, Urveen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKennedy, Margaret A.en_US


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