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dc.contributor.advisorEdmunds, F.H.en_US
dc.creatorSawatsky, L. H.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-02T12:38:20Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:50:16Z
dc.date.available2013-08-22T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:50:16Z
dc.date.created1958-05en_US
dc.date.issued1958-05en_US
dc.date.submittedMay 1958en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-08022012-123820en_US
dc.description.abstractA study of the structure of the Lower Cretaceous Sparky sands in the Saskatchewan part of the Lloydminster field has been made. All available electric logs of wells in this part of the Lloydminster area have been used to draw structure contour and isopach maps of the Sparky oil zone, various stratigraphic cross sections and a contour map of the Lower Cretaceous Mannville formation. A combination of differential compaction, facies changes and regional tilting has resulted in structural and stratigraphic traps suitable for the accumulation of oil and gas. Structural traps result from differential compaction due to variations in grain size of the Sparky sediments. Tilting of the interfingering sands, silts and shales have formed stratigraphic traps. A volumetric estimate of oil reserves in the Lone Rock pool was made. Lack of pertinent production data limited the calculations and many assumptions were necessary. Temperature-viscosity relationships of some of the emulsified and non-emulsified crude oils produced in the field were studied. These relationships indicate a higher viscosity of the emulsion type crude as compared with the viscosity of the same sample in its water free form. A reversal of these properties occur below 60 degrees Fahrenheit. The generally high productivity of the emulsion producing wells could be due to the lower viscosity of the water free crude oil at reservoir temperatures together with the possibility of a higher local permeability in the drainage area. The emulsion is believed to have formed due to agitation by production methods. Note:This thesis contains maps that have been sized to fit the viewing area. Use the zoom in tool to view the maps in detail or to enlarge the text.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Lloydminster field Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.departmentGeological Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeological Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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