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dc.contributor.advisorPhillips, Peter W. B.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorKhachatourians, George G.en_US
dc.creatorChartrand, Harry Hillmanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-08-22T10:15:34Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:53:49Z
dc.date.available2006-08-22T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:53:49Z
dc.date.created2006-07en_US
dc.date.issued2006-07-20en_US
dc.date.submittedJuly 2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-08222006-101534en_US
dc.description.abstractMy objective is to deepen and thicken public and private policy debate about the competitiveness of nations in a global knowledge–based economy. To do so I first demonstrate the inadequacies of the Standard Model of economics, the last ideology standing after the Market-Marx Wars. Second, I develop a methodology (Trans-Disciplinary Induction) to acquire ‘knowledge about knowledge’. In the process of surveying the event horizons of seventeen sub-disciplines of thought, I redefine ‘ideology’ as the search for commensurable sets or systems of ideas shared across knowledge domains and practices. Third, I create a definitional avalanche about knowledge as a noun, verb, form and content in etymology, psychology, epistemology & pedagogy, law and economics. In the process I demonstrate that personal & tacit and codified & tooled knowledge are the staple commodities of the global knowledge-based economy. Fourth, I establish the origins and nature of the Nation-State, the shifting sands of sovereignty on which it stands and the complimentary roles it plays as curator, facilitator, patron, architect and engineer of the national knowledge-base. Fifth, I examine the competitiveness of nations with respect to a production function in which all inputs, outputs and coefficients are defined in terms of knowledge. In the process, I demonstrated that competitiveness, as Darwinian win/lose against rivals, is inadequate because it does not account for the mutualism of symbionts and environmental change, i.e., coevolution and coconstruction. Accordingly, I propose ‘fitness’ as a more appropriate criterion for the competitiveness of nations in a global knowledge-based economy. Finally, I consider the comparative advantage of nations given their initial and differing national knowledge endowments.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectglobalen_US
dc.subjecteconomicsen_US
dc.subjectcompetitivenessen_US
dc.subjectideologyen_US
dc.subjectknowledgeen_US
dc.titleIdeological evolution : the competitiveness of nations in a global knowledge-based economyen_US
thesis.degree.departmentInterdisciplinary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInterdisciplinary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSteele, Tom G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberIsaac, Grant E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFulton, Murray E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBaber, Zaheeren_US


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