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dc.contributor.advisorBinsted, Gordonen_US
dc.creatorRolheiser, Tyler Murrayen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-22T11:48:37Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:54:02Z
dc.date.available2013-08-22T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:54:02Z
dc.date.created2005-11en_US
dc.date.issued2005-11en_US
dc.date.submittedNovember 2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-08222012-114837en_US
dc.description.abstractThe contribution of ventral stream information to the variability of movement has been the focus of much attention, and has provided numerous researchers with conflicting results. These results have been obtained through the use of discrete pointing movements, and as such, do not offer any explanation regarding how ventral stream information contributes to movement variability over time. The present study examined the contribution of ventral stream information to movement variability in three tasks: Hand-only movement, eye-only movement, and an eye-hand coordinated task. Participants performed a continuous reciprocal tapping task to two point-of-light targets for 10 seconds. The targets were visible for the first five seconds, at which point vision of both the targets and the limb was occluded by liquid crystal goggles. Movement variability was similar in all conditions for the initial 5-second interval. The no-vision condition (final 5-seconds) can be summarized as follows: Ventral stream information contributed to an initial significant increase in variability across motor systems, though the different motor systems were able to preserve ventral information integrity differently. The results of these studies can be attributed to the behavioural and cognitive mechanisms that underlie the saccadic and manual motor systems.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleVisuomotor representationsen_US
thesis.degree.departmentCollege of Kinesiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Kinesiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSaucier, Deben_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSpink, Kevinen_US


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