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dc.contributor.advisorBell, Scott M.en_US
dc.creatorGoodall, Amy Jannelleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-28T15:31:25Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:55:26Z
dc.date.available2008-08-30T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:55:26Z
dc.date.created2007-08en_US
dc.date.issued2007-08-30en_US
dc.date.submittedAugust 2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-08282007-153125en_US
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding human spatial cognition and behaviour is not something easily studied. Many factors are involved that contribute in different ways for different individuals. Navigation and wayfinding have been used as an approach, or starting point, for such studies. Spatial abilities tests have long been used as reference points to generalize to overt navigational behaviour. Care needs to be taken in generalizing from paper to behaviour to make certain that it is a valid relationship exists.The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which certain psychometric spatial abilities tests are indicators of actual navigational decision making. The study was conducted in two phases. The navigational decision tasks were made up of four paths with two variables: length and number of turns. The participants were required to make a decision on which direction to go after being lead part of the way around a hallway. The choices were to either go back the way they were led or take a novel route along a previously un-travelled path (shortcut). Spatial abilities tests (MRT, PFT, and OLMT), a self-rating of SOD, and learning preference for novel environments were administered in phase two. While efficient navigation was not explicitly required in the navigation tasks those participants making the most efficient decisions shared similar characteristics. Efficient navigators have a higher aptitude for mental manipulation (as measured by the MRT), express a preference for a more ‘exploratory’ environmental learning style, are disproportionately male, and have a slightly higher self-rating of SOD. In addition to the collective set of four navigation decisions (one for each experimental path), path 2 demonstrated the ‘efficient vs. non-efficient’ distinction quite well: in order to make the most efficient decision the individual must maintain the correct metric distance from the origin point and not be deterred by the passage of only half of the turns in the rectangular experimental environment.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectnavigationen_US
dc.subjectwayfindingen_US
dc.subjectMRTen_US
dc.subjectPFTen_US
dc.subjectspatial abilitiesen_US
dc.subjectOLMTen_US
dc.subjectsense of directionen_US
dc.titleNavigational decision making and spatial abilitiesen_US
thesis.degree.departmentGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPooler, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberNoble, Bram F.en_US


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