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dc.contributor.advisorFagan, Kristinaen_US
dc.creatorAtherton, Carla Mariaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-31T11:23:25Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:55:56Z
dc.date.available2007-09-04T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:55:56Z
dc.date.created2007-09en_US
dc.date.issued2007-09-04en_US
dc.date.submittedSeptember 2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-08312007-112325en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis discusses the relationship between the experiences particular to the female body, namely pregnancy and childbirth, and the language employed to voice these experiences. This thesis is set up to reflect the physical cycle of pregnancy and birth. It is divided into three chapters. The first chapter discusses the desire for and the conception of a new use of language, a language equipped to carry the messages, creations, and voices of women. The conception of an expansion of language and the physical conception of a child are paralleled. In this chapter, poetry about wanting to write, wanting to become pregnant, and conception are used as examples of the emergence of the expanded language. In Chapter Two, the incubation of this new language is discussed, its many components and characteristics are described, and the discussion of the possible existence of a women’s language is continued, by again analyzing a selection of poetry written by women. In this chapter, poetry about pregnancy and childbirth are used to exemplify the use of this language. The discussion of the gestation and birth of the expanded language with the physical gestation and birth of a child are paralleled. In Chapter Three, this notion of a women’s language is further discussed, using poetry about new motherhood to demonstrate the effectiveness and existence of new ways to employ our given language. The discussion of what comes after the birth of a new, expanded language is paralleled with the experiences of a mother after the birth of her child. The ultimate conclusion of this thesis is that there is no one language that women do or should employ when writing, but a movement toward writing through the body when writing about the body, about experiences solely experienced by women.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectmotherhooden_US
dc.subjectchildbirthen_US
dc.subjectpregnancyen_US
dc.subjectpoetryen_US
dc.subjectlanguage theoryen_US
dc.subjectecrite feminineen_US
dc.subjectwomen and languageen_US
dc.subjectmotheringen_US
dc.subjectbirthingen_US
dc.subjectfeminist language theoryen_US
dc.subjectfeminist body theoryen_US
dc.subjectwomen and bodyen_US
dc.subjectembodimenten_US
dc.subjectmaternityen_US
dc.subjectwomen poetsen_US
dc.subjectwomen's poetryen_US
dc.titleA woman writing thinks back through her mothers : an analysis of the language women poets employ through an exploration of poetry about pregnancy and childbirthen_US
thesis.degree.departmentEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDowne, Pamela J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCooley, Ronald W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberClark, Hilaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberVargo, Lisaen_US


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