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dc.contributor.advisorFerguson, Lindaen_US
dc.creatorRohatinsky, Noelle Kimberlyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-01T19:40:25Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:56:08Z
dc.date.available2009-09-03T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:56:08Z
dc.date.created2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.submitted2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09012008-194025en_US
dc.description.abstractMentoring has been proposed as a human resource strategy to encourage recruitment and retention of nurses in Canada. However, very little research exists related to mentoring in nursing. The purpose of this study was to describe the mentoring perceptions of acute care, clinical registered nurses based on their years of nursing practice, age, gender, and education level. A descriptive correlational design was performed on an analysis of a subset of the pre-workshop data gathered as part of the research of Ferguson, Myrick, and Yonge (2006). The conceptual framework used to structure the research questions was Benner’s Novice to Expert model (Benner, 1984; Benner, Tanner, & Chesla, 1996). The main research question related to the relationship between nursing experience level and mentoring perceptions. More specifically, what is the relationship between age, years of nursing practice, education level, gender, and mentoring perceptions including perceived costs and benefits to mentoring, willingness to mentor, mentoring functions of coworkers, and satisfaction with current mentoring relationships? This research established that age, years of nursing practice on the current unit, and education level had some impact on mentoring perceptions. Older nurses believed that the mentor played a greater psychosocial function in the mentorship than did younger nurses. Nurses with fewer years of practice on their current unit perceived fewer “costs” to mentoring, were more satisfied with their mentor, and were more willing to mentor. Previous experience as a protégé positively impacted mentoring perceptions. Nurses with prior mentoring experience were more willing to mentor. There were no significant differences between nurses with diplomas or degrees as their basic or highest level of education in nursing and mentoring perceptions. Nurses with a baccalaureate degree in another discipline perceived more “benefits” to mentoring than their diploma-prepared colleagues. No significant differences were noted when comparing gender with mentoring perceptions. The results of this study will provide healthcare organizations with a deeper understanding of mentoring perceptions and mentorships. From the knowledge acquired by this study, organizations can better encourage and endorse formal and informal mentoring in acute care environments. Retention and recruitment of registered nurses can be facilitated through support for mentoring.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectregistered nursesen_US
dc.subjectrecruitment and retentionen_US
dc.subjectmentoring perceptionsen_US
dc.titleMentoring perceptions of registered nursesen_US
thesis.degree.departmentCollege of Nursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Nursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Nursing (M.N.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSawatzky, Joanen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJeffery, Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJanzen, Bonnieen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberStamler, Lynnette Leesebergen_US


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