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dc.contributor.advisorTempier, Raymonden_US
dc.contributor.advisorLeis, Anneen_US
dc.creatorPuchala, Chassidy Doreenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-01T12:39:17Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:56:09Z
dc.date.available2011-09-08T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:56:09Z
dc.date.created2010-08en_US
dc.date.issued2010-08en_US
dc.date.submittedAugust 2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09012010-123917en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The first objectives of the current study was to determine whether disparities exist in mental health and mental health service use between minority and majority Canadian Francophone and Anglophone communities both within and outside of Quebec. The second objectives was to examine if official language minority-majority status was associated with the presence of common mental health problems and mental health service utilization. Methodology: The current study used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey: Mental Health and Well-being, Cycle 1.2.7 Two main comparisons were made: Quebec Francophones to Quebec Anglophones, and outside Quebec Francophones to outside Quebec Anglophones. Twelve-month and lifetime prevalences of mental disorders and mental health service use were examined through bivariate analyses. Logistic regression analyses determined whether official language minority-majority status significantly predicts mental health problems and mental health service use using the Determinants of Health Model8-10 and Andersen’s behavioural model.11-13 Results: Very few significant differences were found between official language groups both outside and within Quebec, though some notable differences were found between Quebec and outside Quebec: Anglophones and Francophones outside Quebec had a higher prevalence of poor mental health and low life satisfaction compared their respective language counterparts in Quebec. Respondents from outside Quebec had a higher prevalence of consulting with a psychiatrist than respondents from Quebec. There was no significant association between membership in an Official Language Minority Community and mental health problems, and mental health service use. Implications: Although our results indicate that very few differences exist between official language minority and majority groups, these findings remain important and can help aid key stakeholders redirect resources and develop policies and programs towards areas and geographic locations wherein health disparities exist.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectmental health problemsen_US
dc.subjectminority groupsen_US
dc.subjectofficial languageen_US
dc.subjectmental health service useen_US
dc.titleOfficial language minority communities in Canada : is official language minority-majority status associated with mental health problems and mental health service use?en_US
thesis.degree.departmentCommunity Health and Epidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunity Health and Epidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPatten, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLim, Hyunen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJanzen, Bonnieen_US


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