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dc.contributor.advisorNoonan, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHellsten, Laurieen_US
dc.creatorLai, Hollisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-10T12:28:33Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:57:14Z
dc.date.available2009-09-16T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:57:14Z
dc.date.created2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.submitted2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09102008-122833en_US
dc.description.abstractCurrent research suggests that a high level of confidence and a low level of anxiety are predictive of higher math achievement. Compared to students from other provinces, previous research has found that Saskatchewan students have a higher level of confidence and a lower level of anxiety for learning math, but still tend to achieve lower math scores compared to students in other provinces. The data suggest that there may be unique factors effecting math learning for students in Saskatchewan. The purpose of the study is to determine the factors that may affect Saskatchewan students’ math achievement. Exploratory factor analyses and regression methods were employed to investigate possible traits that aid students in achieving higher math scores. Results from a 2007 math assessment administered to grade 5 students in Saskatchewan were used for the current study. The goal of the study was to provide a better understanding of the factors and trends unique to students for mathematic achievements in Saskatchewan. Using results from a province-wide math assessment and an accompanying questionnaire administered to students in grade five across public school in Saskatchewan (n=11,279), the present study found statistical significance in three factors that have been supported by previous studies to influence math achievement differences, specifically in (1) confidence in math, (2) parental involvement in math and (3) extracurricular participation in math. The three aforementioned factors were found to be related to math achievement as predicted by the Assessment for Learning (AFL) program in Saskatchewan, although there were reservations to the findings due to a weak amount of variances accounted for in the regression model (r2 =.084). Furthermore, a multivariate analysis of variance indicated gender and locations of schools to have effects on students’ math achievement scores. Although a high amount of measurement errors in the questionnaire (and subsequently a low variance accounted for by the regression model) limited the scope and implications of the model, future implications and improvements are discusseden_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectLarge scale assessmenten_US
dc.subjectMath Achievementen_US
dc.subjectSecondary data analysisen_US
dc.subjectEducation in Saskatchewanen_US
dc.titleExploring factors affecting math achievement using large scale assessment results in Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychology and Special Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychology and Special Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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