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dc.contributor.advisorNicol, Jennifer A. J.en_US
dc.creatorLabuik, Tara Jeanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-13T12:40:24Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:58:12Z
dc.date.available2011-09-15T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:58:12Z
dc.date.created2010en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.submitted2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09132010-124024en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate whether personal creative activity predicted perceived stress in men living with a chronic physical illness. Personal creative activity was measured with the Creative Achievement Questionnaire (Carson, Peterson, & Higgins, 2005), select questions from the Flow Questionnaire (Collins, 2006), the Everyday Creativity Questionnaire (Ivcevic & Mayer, 2009) and the Creative Behaviour Inventory (Hocevar, 1979). Perceived stress was measured with the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983). Sequential Multiple Regression was used to assess the relationship between personal creative activity and perceived stress levels of males with chronic illness. It was hypothesized that there would be a negative relationship between men‟s personal creative activity involvement and their perceived level of stress; that is, higher personal creative activity scores would be associated with lower perceived stress levels. This relationship was expected to be demonstrated by all men regardless of their diagnosis. Participants included 139 males with chronic illness (mean age: 50 years). Findings indicated that personal creative activity was not related to perceived stress. However the participants reported being involved in many different personal creative activities not included in the four creative measures, which may help explain the low scores on the creativity measures that may have skewed the data and resulted in low correlations. Age and number of symptoms were related to perceived stress. As the participants aged, their perceived stress decreased; and the more symptoms they reported, the higher their perceived stress. The strengths and limitations of the current study are outlined, along with implications for future research and practice. Future research is needed to further examine the relationship between creativity and perceived stress in men with chronic illness as well as to develop creativity measures that include more male-oriented activities.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectperceived stressen_US
dc.subjectmale chronic illnessen_US
dc.subjectcreativityen_US
dc.titlePersonal creative activity, male chronic illness and perceived stress : an exploratory studyen_US
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychology and Special Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychology and Special Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHellsten, Laurie-Ann M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWilson, Jayen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKowalski, Kenten_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKinzel, Audreyen_US


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