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dc.contributor.advisorWalley, Frances L.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorGermida, James J.en_US
dc.creatorNiina, Kunien_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-18T17:19:44Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:59:07Z
dc.date.available2009-09-22T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:59:07Z
dc.date.created2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.submitted2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09182008-171944en_US
dc.description.abstractHerbicides have become a key component in modern agricultural production. Meanwhile, there is a concern that some herbicides persist past the growing season of the treated crop, and negatively influence the production of the subsequently planted crops. Amongst various herbicides used in western Canada, acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS)-inhibiting herbicides warrant special attention given their residual properties and acute plant toxicity at low concentrations in soil. Soil residual AHAS inhibitors have the potential to influence both leguminous host plants and their bacterial symbiotic partners; consequently, the use of an AHAS inhibitor in a given year can negatively influence the inoculation success and grain yield of legumes cropped in the following year. The present thesis project focused on one of the AHAS inhibiting herbicides (flucarbazone) and studied its potential for carryover injury and negative influence on the success of inoculation in field pea. A series of growth chamber and field experiments were conducted to test the following null hypothesis: the presence of residual flucarbazone in soil does not affect nodulation of field pea by inoculum rhizobia. A growth chamber experiment clearly demonstrated the susceptibility of field pea to the presence of flucarbazone in soil where the lowest concentration of flucarbazone amendment (5 ìg kg–1) significantly reduced the crop growth. In contrast, a field study failed to reveal any negative effects of flucarbazone use on crop growth and N2 fixation. It was concluded that if the weather and soil conditions favour decomposition of flucarbazone as described in the present study, flucarbazone applied at the recommended field rate will not persist into the following season at high enough concentrations to negatively influence field pea growth, grain yields, and inoculation success. To ensure safety of rotational crops, it is important to strictly adhere to the herbicide application guidelines. Additionally, producers are cautioned to be particularly aware of the environmental and soil conditions that may reduce the rate of herbicide degradation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectfield peaen_US
dc.subjectPisum sativumen_US
dc.subjectrhizobialen_US
dc.subjectinoculantsen_US
dc.subjectRhizobium rhizobiaen_US
dc.subjectweed controlen_US
dc.subjectherbicidesen_US
dc.subjectpersistenceen_US
dc.subjectresidual herbicideen_US
dc.subjectpost-emergence herbicideen_US
dc.subjectsoil residual herbicideen_US
dc.subjectcrop rotationen_US
dc.subjectleguminous plantsen_US
dc.subjectlegumesen_US
dc.subjectsoil microorganismsen_US
dc.subjectsoil microbesen_US
dc.subjectsustainable agricultureen_US
dc.subjectEveresten_US
dc.subjectflucarbazoneen_US
dc.subjectGroup 2en_US
dc.subjectinoculationen_US
dc.titleInfluence of residual flucarbazone-sodium on inoculation success measured by growth parameters, nitrogen fixation, and nodule occupancy of field peaen_US
thesis.degree.departmentSoil Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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