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dc.contributor.advisorRegnier, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Dianneen_US
dc.creatorKress-White, Margareten_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-20T15:54:37Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T04:59:27Z
dc.date.available2010-09-22T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T04:59:27Z
dc.date.created2009-08en_US
dc.date.issued2009-08en_US
dc.date.submittedAugust 2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09202009-155437en_US
dc.description.abstractThe intent of this work is to explore how children, youth, and adults with disabilities are discriminated against in cultural systems, specifically the education system, and how the beliefs and structures encompassed in these systems create and recreate the phenomena of ableism. This study will explore the hegemony of ableism within school cultures by exposing prevailing discourses and the systems that enforce these discriminatory discourses and educational practices. Additionally, it will illustrate significant human rights infractions and discriminatory processes that keep disabled peoples throughout the world in states of marginalization and oppression. The analysis of this study shows resistance to the oppression of people with disabilities through the use of critical disability theory, legal theory, and social justice philosophy. In addition, the advancement of inclusive education as a human right is offered as a solution to the collective oppression and states of disenfranchisement that many disabled people’s experience. The exploration of moral and legal theory, equality jurisprudence, and libratory pedagogy will advance a collective human rights framework as an educational model for school cultures globally. This analysis will utilize an equality premise known as the “right to belong” to defend inclusive education as a fundamental human right. In support of this fundamental right, a theoretical base for inclusive pedagogies reveals how the deconstruction of hegemonic practices and, simultaneously, the development of transformative educational models of learning are necessary “best practices” in the pursuit of equality for all disabled students. This work concludes with recommendations for changes in educational leadership, philosophy, and research of education for disabled students.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectsocial model of disabilityen_US
dc.subjecteugenicsen_US
dc.subjectdisability rights movementen_US
dc.subjectableismen_US
dc.subjectcritique of special educationen_US
dc.subjectinclusive educationen_US
dc.subjecthuman rightsen_US
dc.subjectmedical model of disabilityen_US
dc.subjectcritical disability theoryen_US
dc.subjectbelonging as a notion of equalityen_US
dc.subjectlegal and moral theoryen_US
dc.subjectliberation pedagogiesen_US
dc.subjectrights of persons with disabilitiesen_US
dc.titleThe Quest of Inclusion: Understandings of Ableism, Pedagogy and the Right To Belongen_US
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Foundationsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundationsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (M.Ed.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWatkinson, Ailsaen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWilson, Alexandriaen_US


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