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dc.creatorMorgan, Debra Gailen_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-10-21T00:03:42Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T05:02:51Z
dc.date.available1996-09-01T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T05:02:51Z
dc.date.created1996-09en_US
dc.date.issued1996-09-01en_US
dc.date.submittedSeptember 1996en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-10212004-000342en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of environmental density on the behavior (Disruptive and Nondisruptive) of elderly residents with dementia living on a special care unit. A building project that led to relocation of residents from high density units to units that varied in density (low vs. high) provided a natural context for this study. Disruptive and Nondisruptive behavior are composite variables that together include the full range of behavioral responses. Both are composed of several subvariables. Data were collected using direct behavioral observation using the Environment-Behavior Interaction Code (Stewart & Hiscock, 1992b) and a hand-held computer. The first objective of the study was to examine behavior patterns in relation to density and privacy. This objective was addressed with a quasi-experimental design (Study 1), in which three hypotheses were tested. It was predicted that residents who moved from a high density unit to a low density unit would exhibit a greater reduction in rate of Disruptive behavior (Hypothesis 1) and a greater increase in rate of Nondisruptive behavior (Hypothesis 2), compared to residents in a constant high density condition. It was also predicted that use of Private Time (time spent alone in one's bedroom) would be greater on the low density unit, where residents had private rooms (Hypothesis 3). Results of Study 1 provided support for Hypotheses 1 and 2, in relation to comparisons with the External Comparison Group only. Within subjects analyses provided additional support for Hypothesis 1 (Disruptive behavior). Hypothesis 3 (Private Time) was also supported. The second objective of the study was to explore the perceptions of family and staff caregivers with regard to the effect of the environment on resident behavior. This study was addressed with a qualitative design (Study 2) using the grounded theory method. Participants in Study 2 described the needs of residents with dementia in relation to the physical and social environment, and the outcomes that occurred when these needs were met or not met. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectdwellingsen_US
dc.subjectageden_US
dc.subjectlong-term care facilitiesen_US
dc.subjectnursing homesen_US
dc.subjectsenile dementia -- patients -- careen_US
dc.subjectgeriatric nursingen_US
dc.subjectold ageen_US
dc.titleImpact of high versus low density special care units on the behavior of elderly residents with dementiaen_US
thesis.degree.departmentCollege of Nursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Nursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberStewart, Norma J.en_US


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