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dc.contributor.advisorWard, Angelaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGingell, Susanen_US
dc.creatorBalzer, Geraldine Annen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-25T07:05:49Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T05:06:45Z
dc.date.available2006-10-25T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T05:06:45Z
dc.date.created2006-10en_US
dc.date.issued2006-10-16en_US
dc.date.submittedOctober 2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-10252006-070549en_US
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative study explored the potential for decolonizing the secondary English Language Arts classroom. An interdisciplinary approach was used to explore contemporary theories of literary criticism relevant to the study of Aboriginal literature, including an approach through colonial and post-colonial discourse and the growing body of theory and criticism written by North American Aboriginals; to incorporate literary theory and pedagogical knowledge of content into the development of Aboriginal literature units FOR secondary school classrooms; and to incorporate these new interpretive and pedagogical understandings into the practices of two secondary English teachers using North American Aboriginal literature in their classrooms.A document was prepared that explored the interpretive potentials of postcolonial and Aboriginal literary theories and given to the two participating teachers who were able to use this information to develop instructional units for their literature classes. Action research framed the approach used to implement, revise, and evaluate the units of study in the two grade twelve classrooms. The participating teachers found that the critical lenses enabled them to approach Aboriginal literature with more confidence and insight. They also found that their classroom use of Aboriginal literature disclosed the misconceptions their students held concerning Aboriginal peoples. The teachers were frustrated by the systemic racism evident in their classrooms. They were also frustrated by the resistance shown by their teaching peers toward incorporating Aboriginal literature and anti-racist methodologies into their instruction.The findings of this study suggest that more exposure to critical literary theories and minority literatures in the context of teachers’ pre-service and in-service education may help to decolonize Canadian classrooms.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectAnti-racist Educationen_US
dc.subjectAboriginal Educationen_US
dc.subjectSecondary English Language Artsen_US
dc.subjectAboriginal Literary Theoryen_US
dc.subjectPostcolonial Theoryen_US
dc.subjectSense of Placeen_US
dc.subjectMulticultural Educationen_US
dc.subjectTeacher Identityen_US
dc.titleDecolonizing the classroom : reading Aboriginal literature through the lenses of contemporary literary theoriesen_US
thesis.degree.departmentInterdisciplinary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInterdisciplinary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRobinson, Samen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRalph, Edwinen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMarken, Ronald N. G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGambell, Trevoren_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBattiste, Marieen_US


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