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dc.creatorParsons, Margaret Rossen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-30T09:29:39Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T05:09:31Z
dc.date.available2012-12-06T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T05:09:31Z
dc.date.created1978en_US
dc.date.issued1978en_US
dc.date.submitted1978en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-11302011-092939en_US
dc.description.abstractAllegory and fantasy with a moral purpose are literary forms so closely related as to be practically synonymous; the basic intention of both is to instruct by means of a narrative whose underlying purpose can be identified, or at least sensed, by the average reader. The author provides for the reader what Angus Fletcher calls "signposts"; these state the aim of the work, sometimes by direct explanatory comment, but more usually in the form of symbols. These symbols deliberately draw attention to the secondary meanings, give continual "object lessons," and make clear the ultimate, larger truths the author is attempting to communicate.1 Stanislas Klossowski de Rola, Alchemy: The Secret Art (New York: Bounty Books, 1973) 18.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTowards an understanding of George MacDonald : a study of symbolism in the fantasy worksen_US
thesis.degree.departmentEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHorne, B. L.en_US


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