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dc.contributor.advisorPeters, Evelynen_US
dc.creatorJersak, Chelseyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-09T20:12:15Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T05:10:02Z
dc.date.available2010-12-11T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T05:10:02Z
dc.date.created2009-11en_US
dc.date.issued2009-11-01en_US
dc.date.submittedNovember 2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12092009-201215en_US
dc.description.abstractConstructed in successive stages beginning in 1935, the Moscow metro was designed to be the foremost transportation system in Stalinist Moscow as well as a symbol of socialist might and a metonym for the future socialist society. Soviet officials heralded the metro as an underground palace promoting the values of socialism, and the artwork therein was meant to reflect these values. When Sverdlov Square station opened in 1938, it was decorated with bas-sculptures in the newly sanctioned socialist realist style; the artist, Natalia Danko, chose to depict pairs of male and female folk dancers from seven of the largest nationalities of the Soviet Union. Her sculptures celebrated an idealized view of folk culture that sought to glorify the Soviet state by reflecting ideals such as “the joy of every day life” and “the friendship of the peoples.” This thesis employs semiotics to reveal the ambiguity with which viewers may have read these signs, and to demonstrate the polyvalent nature of artistic production. Semiotic theory is useful in order to show how the official discourse of Socialist Realism could be both contested and reinforced through public art. The thesis contends that the Moscow metro, one of the superlative Soviet projects of the 1930s, can be understood as an ambiguous space where meaning was open to diverse interpretations.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectsemioticsen_US
dc.subjectmass transiten_US
dc.subjectpublic arten_US
dc.subjectsocialist realismen_US
dc.subjectStalinismen_US
dc.titleReading the metro: socialist realism and Sverdlov Square station, 1938en_US
thesis.degree.departmentGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberNoble, Bramen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcCannon, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBiggs, Lesleyen_US


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