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dc.contributor.advisorBradley, Michael P.en_US
dc.creatorDesautels, Phillip Rolanden_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-17T13:54:18Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T05:10:52Z
dc.date.available2010-12-22T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T05:10:52Z
dc.date.created2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.submitted2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12172009-135418en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis describes the fabrication and testing of electroluminescent diodes made from silicon subjected to plasma ion implantation. A silicon-compatible, electrically driven light source is desired to increase the speed and efficiency of short-range data transfer in the communications and computing industries. As it is an indirect band gap material, ordinary silicon is too inefficient a light source to be useful for these applications. Past experiments have demonstrated that modifying the structural properties of the crystal can enhance its luminescence properties, and that light ion implantation is capable of achieving this effect. This research investigates the relationship between the ion implantation processing parameters, the post-implantation annealing temperature, and the observable electroluminescence from the resulting silicon diodes. Prior to the creation of electroluminescent devices, much work was done to improve the efficiency and reliability of the fabrication procedure. A numerical algorithm was devised to analyze Langmuir probe data in order to improve estimates of implanted ion fluence. A new sweeping power supply to drive current to the probe was designed, built, and tested. A custom software package was developed to improve the speed and reliability of plasma ion implantation experiments, and another piece of software was made to facilitate the viewing and analysis of spectra measured from the finished silicon LEDs. Several dozen silicon diodes were produced from wafers implanted with hydrogen, helium, and deuterium, using a variety of implanted ion doses and post-implantation annealing conditions. One additional device was fabricated out of unimplanted, unannealed silicon. Most devices, including the unimplanted device, were electroluminescent at visible wavelengths to some degree. The intensity and spectrum of light emission from each device were measured. The results suggest that the observed luminescence originated from the native oxide layer on the surface of the ion-implanted silicon, but that the intensity of luminescence could be enhanced with a carefully chosen ion implantation and annealing procedure.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectoptoelectronicsen_US
dc.subjectcondensed matter physicsen_US
dc.subjectsemiconductor physicsen_US
dc.subjectplasma ion implantationen_US
dc.subjectsilicon photonicsen_US
dc.titleFabrication of electroluminescent silicon diodes by plasma ion implantationen_US
thesis.degree.departmentPhysics and Engineering Physicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysics and Engineering Physicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKlymyshyn, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberXiao, Chijinen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKoustov, Sashaen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberTse, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHussey, Glennen_US


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