Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorStamler, Lynnette Leesebergen_US
dc.creatorGraham, Hollyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-21T16:28:48Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T05:12:30Z
dc.date.available2006-12-21T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T05:12:30Z
dc.date.created2006-12en_US
dc.date.issued2006-12-21en_US
dc.date.submittedDecember 2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12212006-162848en_US
dc.description.abstractThe current state of Aboriginal health is of national concern. Aboriginal people as a population do not have the same level of health as other Canadians. There has been a long history of providing health care based on Eurocentric (Western) ideology that has not taken into account Aboriginal peoples’ perspective. There is limited research to provide insight toward understanding how Aboriginal people understand, define, and address their health concerns. This study used the Kaupapa Maori Philosophy/Methodology to define health from a Plains Cree (Indigenous) perspective. A qualitative descriptive research study was done in Thunderchild First Nation. A combination of purposeful and convenience snowball sampling was utilized to select 14 participants to reach saturation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eleven open-ended questions to facilitate elaborations during the interviews. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data, and then the data was categorized using the Medicine Wheel. Four broad themes were derived from the data. Health was consistently described in relation to physical, emotional, intellectual (mental), and spiritual wellness. Collectively there does appear to be a holistic perception of health, similar to the teachings from the Medicine Wheel. Half of the participants described health from a holistic perspective and half described health using two of the four components of the Medicine Wheel: physical, emotional, intellectual (mental), and spiritual wellness. Pursuing and maintaining health included a combination of information and practices from both the Western and Traditional Indigenous world. Further collaboration and research is necessary to determine if the findings are similar among other Aboriginal Peoples’ in Saskatchewan.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectspiritual wellnessen_US
dc.subjectKaupapa Maori Philosophyen_US
dc.subjectaboriginal healthen_US
dc.titleDefining health from a Plains Cree perspectiveen_US
thesis.degree.departmentCollege of Nursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Nursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Nursing (M.N.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record