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dc.contributor.advisorPetrucka, Pammlaen_US
dc.creatorDuchcherer, Crystal Marieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T16:01:09Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-04T05:12:46Z
dc.date.available2012-02-25T08:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2013-01-04T05:12:46Z
dc.date.created2010-11en_US
dc.date.issued2010-11en_US
dc.date.submittedNovember 2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12232010-160109en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: In Canada, the prevalence of cervical cancer in Aboriginal women continues to increase with a significantly higher mortality rate than women of non-Aboriginal ancestry. Despite that invasive cervical cancer is highly preventable with regular cervical cancer screening, participation in screening remains lower among Aboriginal women. Since limited information exists on the way cervical cancer screening is perceived and experienced, the purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of Saskatchewan Aboriginal women’s perceptions related to and experiences with cervical cancer screening. Methodology: This qualitative exploratory study used an interpretive descriptive approach. Perceptions related to and experiences with cervical cancer screening were elicited through individual interviews with eleven Dakota First Nation women. Women were recruited through purposive sampling techniques. Initially direct quotes from individual transcripts were coded, and then organized with other participant quotes that reflected thematic similarities. Findings: Shared insights reflected a main theme that described perceptions of, experiences with, and factors influencing cervical cancer screening participation among Saskatchewan Aboriginal women. This theme, transitioning from experiencing the negatives of cervical cancer screening participation to living healthier, consisted of the women’s mind-set (attitudes and cultural beliefs), knowledge, encounters with the health care system, and sharing information across the generations, which included patterns of communication and a community oriented approach. Discussion: Findings of this study suggest that improving knowledge about cervical cancer screening and cervical cancer may increase screening utilization. Emphasis on health promotion and prevention should be considered when designing education programs. Interventions designed to improve screening rates are more effective when community members are involved in each phase, ensuring cultural relevance. Improving knowledge about, experiences with, and stories shared regarding cervical cancer screening among Aboriginal women may increase screening rates.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectAboriginalen_US
dc.subjectPap testen_US
dc.subjectcommunity healthen_US
dc.subjectnursingen_US
dc.subjectcervical cancer screeningen_US
dc.subjectFirst Nationsen_US
dc.subjectwomen's healthen_US
dc.titleExploring cervical cancer screening behaviour : an interpretive description of Aboriginal women's experiencesen_US
thesis.degree.departmentCollege of Nursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Nursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Saskatchewanen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Nursing (M.N.)en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDuggleby, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRacine, Louiseen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDietrich Leurer, Marieen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberStamler, Lynnetteen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKlassen, Lauraen_US


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